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Gwenda Morgan Beautiful Woodcuts

January 25, 2021

Hello one and all. I shall start by thanking everyone who came and bought from my ‘shop’ @fishinkblog on Instagram over the weekend. If you missed it don’t worry there are still many wonderful ceramics for you to browse through, but it was a great sucess and my work is now on it’s way to the USA and Australia which is fab.

I thought as it’s been particually snowy here in the UK of late that this artists’ work may be just the tonic, enjoy !

Gwenda Morgan (1908 – 1991) was born in Petworth, her father having moved there to work at the ironmongers Austens, of which he later became the proprietor. Following school in Petworth and at Brighton and Hove High School. From 1926, Gwenda studied at Goldsmiths’ College of Art in London.

From 1930 she attended the Grosvenor School of Modern Art in Pimlico where she was taught and very strongly influenced by the principal, Iain Macnab.  The Grosvenor School was a progressive art school, and the championing of wood engraving and linocuts fitted with its democratic approach to the arts.

The main body of her work drew upon the landscape and buildings around Petworth and the neighbouring South Downs. Her work was inspired by that of Iain Macnab, Percy Douglas Bliss and the Sussex-bred Eric Ravilious.

Throughout the Second World War she worked in the Women’s Land Army just outside Petworth. Her record of those years was published by the Whittington Press in 2002 as The Diary of a Land Girl, 1939-1945. It is a poignant record of the determination to carry on whatever the weather or wartime deprivations.

Here’s an excerpt from Christmas Eve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

She was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Painter-Etchers & Engravers, an Honorary Member of the Society of Wood Engravers, and a Member of the National Society of Painters, Sculptors and Engravers, and she showed work at their annual exhibitions. She also exhibited at the Royal Academy and at the Redfern Gallery.

Her prints are held in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum and the British Museum in London, the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, and the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, among others.

Some of her work has a wonderful sense of movement… even the still life woodcuts!

I feel that Gwenda’s work is somehow timeless, like this image above called ‘Winter Arrangement’, it feels like it could have been created last week and not over 60 years ago, as it was originally engraved in 1954!

Here’s a great shot of Gwenda with her family.

Lovely depictions of rural lifestyles at that time.

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One Comment leave one →
  1. February 6, 2021 11:32 pm

    Glad you think Gwenda Morgan’s work is exceptional, as we do.
    At Kevis House Gallery, in Gwenda’s home town of Petworth, we have got the largest collection of her work for sale, including many of the ones you show here. Some, but no means all, are on our website.

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